Call or Papers
Call for Papers: Monetary Policy in Historical Perspective (16th-19th Centuries)

16 October 2020 – Keynote speakers: Francois Velde (Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago)

Organisers: Dr Stefano Locatelli (History, UoM), Dr Nuno Palma (Economics, UoM)

Submission closes: 31st January 2020 Acceptance notification: 28th February 2020

Abstracts submission: stefano.locatelli@manchester.ac.uknuno.palma@manchester.ac.uk

Registration is free; there will be a limited number of accommodation and travel grants available. Priority will be given to speakers without a faculty position (PhDs and Postdocs). Please, indicate in your email if you need financial support.

To submit papers please email the organisers – include your title and an abstract. There is no need to submit a full paper at this stage, although priority may be given those sending a full text. This workshop will bring together researches interested in exploring different policies and strategies adopted by various actors such as rulers, governments and ordinary people in time of monetary ‘crisis’, as well as normal times, between the 16th and 19th centuries. To what extent did political changes of a territory affects its economy and monetary system and vice versa, and what effects did those ‘local’ changes have on the macro level, i.e. on the process of integration of economic and monetary markets? These are key questions of the proposed event, which also aims at providing a comprehensive discussion of monetary and financial ‘crisis’, taking into account different phenomena such as the provision of precious metals, minting policies, money supply, monetary fluctuations, and financial market integration.

This one-day workshop will be organised on 16th October 2020 and will host Francois Velde (Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago) with a contribution on the Neapolitan banks in the context of early modern public banks.

This event is sponsored by the ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) and the Manchester Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence, and is the second part of a two-part event organised in collaboration with the History Department, the Department of Economics and the Centre for Economic Cultures at the University of Manchester.

Thank you for your time and attention. We look forward to receiving your proposals. Best wishes, Stefano and Nuno


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Economic History Association, Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin La Crosse, 1725 State St., La Crosse WI 54601