Fall 2022
Money, Sanctions and International Law

Contributors:  Rawi Abdelal/Alexandra Vacroux, Charlotte Beaucillon, Ben Coates, Anna Gelpern, David Singh Grewal, Daniel Nielson, Stephen Park/Suzanne Katzenstein, Adam Tooze.

This roundtable deals with questions about the system of international monetary production, international law, and politics that have come into sharp relief in the context of economic sanctions issued against Russia.
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Money, Sanctions and International Law

Fall 2022 - Money, Sanctions and International Law
International Law and 21st Century Financial Warfare

Suzanne Katzenstein, Duke University; Stephen Park, University of Connecticut
Financial sanctions of the current scope and magnitude can no longer be relied upon to enforce international law in a manner that complies with it. Relying on international law to constrain the impacts of warfare—here, financial warfare—may also risk legitimizing its expanding use.
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International Law and 21st Century Financial Warfare

Spring 2022 - Sovereign Debt Architecture, Suspended
A Manifesto for Going from Billions to Trillions in Climate Finance Now: Some Highlights of the Bridgetown Initiative

Avinash Persaud, Gresham College in the UK
The geography of the political economy is why climate mitigation is not happening fast enough. A coalition has developed five integrated “asks” as part of the broader 'Bridgetown Initiative’ unveiled by Prime Minister Mottley of Barbados in September. They will deliver more change to the debt, aid, and funding architecture than we have seen in a lifetime.
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A Manifesto for Going from Billions to Trillions in Climate Finance Now: Some Highlights of the Bridgetown Initiative

Spring 2022 - Sovereign Debt Architecture, Suspended
The Depressing Tenacity of the Global Debt Architecture

Odette Lienau, Cornell University and Boston College
One silver(y) lining of a massive global crisis could have been the summoning of enough collective willpower to enact far-reaching change in international debt architecture. Instead we have seen piecemeal efforts that will prove insufficient. The international community needs to prioritize serious movement on multiple tracks to put in place a framework that embeds widely accepted sovereign debt resolution principles before it is desperately needed.
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The Depressing Tenacity of the Global Debt Architecture

Spring 2022 - Sovereign Debt Architecture, Suspended
Sovereign Debt and Hegemonic Transitions

Juan Flores Zendejas, University of Geneva
Changes in borrowing patterns by many middle-income countries reflect ongoing changes in the economic and geopolitical context. As creditors continue to grow more heterogeneous, debt default management and creditor coordination are likely to become major challenges to global economic governance.
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Sovereign Debt and Hegemonic Transitions