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Just Money Profiles
Destin Jenkins, Co-Editor

Destin Jenkins is the Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of History at the University of Chicago. He specializes in racial capitalism’s history and consequences for democracy and inequality in the United States. He earned his undergraduate degree from Columbia University (2010), and doctorate from Stanford University (2016). He has held fellowships at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University, and the Robert L. Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies at The New School.

Destin Jenkins is the author of The Bonds of Inequality: Debt and the Making of the American City (The University of Chicago Press). Indebtedness, like inequality, has become a ubiquitous condition in the United States. Yet few have probed American cities’ dependence on municipal debt or how the terms of municipal finance structure racial privileges, entrench spatial neglect, elide democratic input, and distribute wealth and power. In The Bonds of Inequality, Jenkins shows in vivid detail how, beyond the borrowing decisions of American cities and beneath their quotidian infrastructure, there lurks a world of politics and finance that is rarely seen, let alone understood. Focusing on San Francisco, The Bonds of Inequality offers a singular view of the postwar city, one where the …
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Destin Jenkins, Co-Editor

Just Money Profiles
Christine Desan, Managing Editor

Christine Desan is the Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the author of Making Money:  Coin, Currency, and the Coming of Capitalism (Oxford University Press, 2014). The book argues that a radical transformation in the way societies produce money ushered in capitalism as a public project.  From creating money as a direct credit (coined or not) that linked the political community to members, sovereigns moved to intermediating the public medium.  They issued it through investors, nascent central bankers, and enshrined the profit motive as the incentive that regulated money’s production.  Those innovations exploded old strictures on money creation and revolutionized attitudes towards self-interest.

Desan’s research more generally explores money as a constitutional (small “c”) project that structures material life and governance. Earlier work focused on the adjudicative power of legislatures and sovereign immunity.  Desan teaches courses on the constitutional law of money, globalization as a monetary phenomenon, and monetary reform.  She is co-founder of Harvard’s Program on the Study of Capitalism, an interdisciplinary project that brings together classes, resources, research funds, and advising on that subject and has taught the Program’s anchoring research seminar, the Workshop on the Political Economy of Modern Capitalism, with Professor Sven


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Christine Desan, Managing Editor

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Hannah Hubbard, Assistant Editor

Hannah Hubbard

Hannah is a J.D. candidate at Harvard Law School. She is involved in the Consumer Protection Law Students Association, Street Justice Coalition, and Lambda. She has interned at the Committee for Public Counsel Services in Roxbury and the National Consumer Law Center in Boston. Hannah is also an Editor for Unbound: Harvard Journal of the Legal Left and an Article and Executive Content Editor for the Harvard Journal of Law & Gender.

Hannah’s interests include consumer protection, the history of U.S. capitalism, and critical legal theory. When she graduates, Hannah wants to return to her home state of North Carolina and practice consumer law.

Hannah has a B.A. in Economics (with a minor in History) from Wellesley College.…
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Hannah Hubbard, Assistant Editor

Just Money Profiles
Dan Rohde, Assistant Editor

Dan Rohde

Dan Rohde is an S.J.D. Candidate at Harvard Law School, where his research focuses on the legal history of money and capitalism, particularly in the legal history and design of monetary institutions, business firms and employment. His dissertation will look at the legal history of the Bank of Canada, and will explore how its creation was interlaced with the growth of Canadian sovereignty and Canadian  capitalism.

Prior to enrolling at Harvard Law School, Dan practiced in labor and employment law at a leading union-side law firm in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, as well as at a legal clinic that specializes in cases with a systemic impact on those living in poverty throughout Ontario. Originally from Syracuse, NY, he also worked briefly as an elementary school teacher in Brooklyn, NY.

Dan has a B.A. from the New School University, an M.S. in Education from Brooklyn College, and a J.D. from the University of Toronto Faculty of Law.  After law school, he clerked at the Ontario Court of Appeal for Associate Chief Justice Alexandra Hoy, Associate Chief Justice Dennis O’Connor and Justice Eileen Gillese.


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Dan Rohde, Assistant Editor

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Mehrsa Baradaran, Co-Editor

Mehrsa Baradaran is a professor of law at the University of California, Irvine School of Law.  Baradaran writes about banking law, financial inclusion, inequality, and the racial wealth gap. Her scholarship includes the books How the Other Half Banks and The Color of Money: Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap, both published by the Harvard University Press. The Color of Money: Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap was awarded the Best Book of the Year by the Urban Affairs Association, the PROSE Award Honorable Mention in the Business, Finance & Management category. Baradaran was also selected as a finalist at the 2018 Georgia Author of the Year Awards for the book in the category of history/biography.

Baradaran has also published articles including “Jim Crow Credit” in the Irvine Law Review, “Regulation by Hypothetical” in the Vanderbilt Law Review, “It’s Time for Postal Banking” in the Harvard Law Review Forum, and  “Banking and the Social Contract” in the Notre Dame Law Review.  Baradaran and her books have received significant national and international media coverage and have been featured in the New York Times, the AtlanticSlateAmerican Banker, the Wall Street
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Mehrsa Baradaran, Co-Editor

Just Money Profiles
Isabel Feichtner, Co-Editor

Isabel Feichtner is professor of law at Julius-Maximilians University Würzburg. She is the author of The Law and Politics of WTO Waivers. Stability and Flexibility in Public International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2012). Her work spans international economic law and the law of money and finance. It seeks to explain how particular monetary and fiscal constitutions promote the expansion of extraction and impact exercises in valuation.

Feichtner currently leads a research project on the Democratization of Money and Credit. This research project focuses on the monetary constitution of the European Union and its impact on the fiscal constitutions of the EU and its member states. It explores the scope for institutional re-design and experimentation and in particular the potential of parallel and complementary currencies in pursuing objectives of social inclusion and ecological transformation. Feichtner’s recent writings include Public Law’s Rationalization of the Legal Architecture of Money: What Might Legal Analysis of Money Become? (German Law Journal, 2016), Sharing the Riches of the Sea: The Redistributive and Fiscal Dimension of Deep Seabed Exploitation (European Journal of International Law, 2019) and Law of Natural Resource Extraction and Money as Key to Understanding Global Political Economy and Potential for Its Transformation (in The …
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Isabel Feichtner, Co-Editor

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Roy Kreitner, Co-Editor

Roy Kreitner is a professor at the law faculty of Tel Aviv University. His research focuses on private law theory, jurisprudence and legal history, and the history and theory of money. His scholarship includes Calculating Promises: The Emergence of Modern American Contract Doctrine (Stanford, 2007), and articles such as The Jurisprudence of Global Money (Theoretical Inquiries in Law, 2010); Legal History of Money (Annual Review of Law and Social Science, 2012); Toward a Political Economy of Money (in Research Handbook on Political Economy and Law, Hugo Mattei & John D. Haskell eds., 2015); Voicing the Market (Toronto Law Journal, 2019); and Money Talks: Institutional Investors and Voice in Contract (Theoretical Inquiries in Law, 2019).

Kreitner is currently working on a book manuscript on the history of money in the United States between the Civil War and World War I. The book details the transformation of money from a searing issue of electoral politics in the last third of the 19th century to an expert dominated issue of bank reform by the time of the establishment of the Federal Reserve. It tries to answer the question of how money could go from center-stage and fever pitch to non-partisan technocratic reform within …
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Roy Kreitner, Co-Editor

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Lev Menand, Co-Editor

Lev Menand is a lecturer in law and academic fellow at Columbia Law School. Lev’s research focuses on banking law and financial regulation, central banking, money and monetary administration, the law of regulated industries, legal theory, and the history of economic thought. During the Obama administration, Lev served as senior advisor to the Deputy Secretary of the Treasury and senior advisor to the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Financial Institutions. He has also worked as an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in both the Bank’s Supervision Group and in its Research and Statistics Group, where he helped to develop econometric models for the Federal Reserve System’s first Comprehensive Capital Assessment and Review. During his time at the New York Fed, Lev was seconded to the Financial Stability Oversight Council, where he helped to prepare the Council’s first financial stability report. Lev has a B.A. from Harvard College and a J.D. from Yale Law School. He clerked for Judge Jed S. Rakoff on the Southern District of New York and Chief Judge Robert A. Katzmann on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.…
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Lev Menand, Co-Editor

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Nadav Orian Peer, Co-Editor

Nadav Orian Peer is an associate professor at the University of Colorado Law School. His scholarship and teaching focus on the law of financial institutions, including banking, capital markets, derivatives and community reinvestment.

Orian Peer’s research explores the intense framework of governance and regulation that undergirds the day-to-day functioning of financial markets. The design and operation of this framework has profound implications for the distribution of credit and economic opportunity in society. His recent articles include Negotiating the Lender-of-Last-Resort: The 1913 Fed Act as a Debate Over Credit Distribution (15 NYU Journal of Law & Business, 2019) and Your Grandfather’s Shadow Banking: Clearing and Call Loans in Gilded Age New York, forthcoming in Inside Money: Re-Theorizing Liquidity (Christine Desan ed.). Orian Peer’s current research focuses on policy proposals to increase access to credit for important social goals like fair housing, and climate mitigation efforts.

Before joining Colorado Law, Orian Peer worked as a visiting assistant professor in Tulane Law School, as well as a business economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago (Financial Markets Group). He completed an S.J.D. at Harvard Law School, where he taught as a Byse Fellow. As a member of the Israel Bar Association, he …
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Nadav Orian Peer, Co-Editor

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Morgan Ricks, Co-Editor

Morgan Ricks is Professor of Law at Vanderbilt University Law School. He studies financial regulation. From 2009-10, he was a senior policy advisor and financial restructuring expert at the U.S. Treasury Department, where he focused primarily on financial stability initiatives and capital markets policy. Before joining the Treasury Department, he was a risk-arbitrage trader at Citadel Investment Group, a Chicago-based hedge fund. He previously served as a vice president in the investment banking division of Merrill Lynch & Co., where he specialized in strategic and capital-raising transactions for financial services companies. He began his career as a mergers and acquisitions attorney at Wachtell Lipton Rosen & Katz. He is the author of The Money Problem: Rethinking Financial Regulation (U. Chicago Press 2016).

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Morgan Ricks, Co-Editor

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Bryna Godar, Columnist

Bryna Godar is a JD at Harvard Law School (class of 2021). Prior to law school, Bryna worked as a journalist in Wisconsin and Minnesota, including at The Capital Times and The Associated Press. She primarily covered policy and politics at the local, state, and national levels, including national elections, the criminal law system, and government spending decisions.

As a law student, Bryna has focused on economic and social justice. She has worked as a legal intern at the Immigrant Law Center of Minnesota, is involved in the Cyberlaw Clinic at Harvard Law School, and has researched data tracking requirements for police departments. She is also an editor for the Harvard Law Review and a mediator for the Harvard Mediation Program.

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Bryna Godar, Columnist

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Gavriel Schreiber, Columnist

Gavriel is a JD candidate at Harvard Law School (class of 2021). Before coming to law school, Gavriel spent a year teaching English in Taiwan on a Fulbright grant. Gavriel spent his 1L summer at the Colorado Attorney General’s Office in Denver, and plans to split his 2L summer between Akin Gump in DC and District Attorney Larry Krasner’s office in Philadelphia. At law school, he serves as an editor of the Harvard Law Review and is a member of the Harvard Law softball team.


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Gavriel Schreiber, Columnist

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Michael Svedman, Columnist

Michael Svedman is a JD at Harvard Law School (class of 2020). He has worked as a legal intern at ArchCity Defenders, a civil rights law firm in St. Louis, MO, and as a summer associate in the corporate department at Cravath, Swaine & Moore in New York, NY. Michael’s research as a law student has focused on matters related to the law of money and finance, and he has written on topics including the Italian mini-BOT proposal and the status of parallel currencies under EU law, the political economy of large passive investment vehicles, and corporate governance reforms aimed at curbing financialization.

Michael is also the executive article editor of the Harvard Law & Policy Review and a managing editor of the Harvard Law School Blockchain and Fintech Initiative’s Ledgers & Law blog.…
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Michael Svedman, Columnist